A World Worth Saving

rainbow 3Recently, I read that there have been several cases where surrogate mothers discovered that they were carrying babies with downs syndrome and they were told to abort their babies by the biological parents, but they refused and decided to keep the babies.  I have also read, that Richard Dawkins believes that it is immoral to allow a “Downs Syndrome baby” to come to term. Notice, for him, the syndrome comes first, not the humanity of the baby.  For him, abortion is the only moral option.  I have to wonder at this current attitude in face of the barbaric cruelty of ISIS. After all, they believe that killing infidels is the only moral option.  Sometimes, those infidels are little children.

The other day, as I was walking with my son in the late evening, mourning over the recent gruesome tragedies inflicted by ISIS,  my son asked me how come it was gruesome for ISIS to behead men women and children, but there was little moral outrage when babies in the womb were dismembered and beheaded.  Abortion is every bit as violent as ISIS, but it is funded by US tax dollars.  Millions of babies have been brutally murdered through abortion in the last thirty years. It is so horrifically common it seems to slip by people’s conscious thought.  Every day in the US we basically behead innocent babies.

This leads me back to the eugenics movement to rid the world of people with Downs Syndrome.  I find it interesting that Christians and Downs Syndrome children are especially targeted for extermination.  Why is that? The people I have known with Downs Syndrome, and the parents who care for them, tend to be very happy people.  In fact, one mother  I know who recently lost her adult daughter with downs syndrome to cancer told me that her daughter was the best gift she ever had.  Her daughter taught her to love in a way she had never experienced before. Clearly, people with Downs Syndrome are still people.  Just like Christians are still people, even though they may not believe what ISIS believes.  Yet in both cases, there are those who would convince the world that we all would be better off without them.  Their kind.  Their influence. What is the danger exactly? Are they hurting anyone?  Are they aggressively trying to take over the world?  No, they just ask something of us that perhaps we do not want to give. People with Downs Syndrome ask for an unconditional love, which they more often than not, fully return. Christians ask for a sacrificial love, which, when lived as Christ lived, is also fully returned.

So I have to ask myself – what are we saving the world from? Love?  Perhaps we need to wonder less if we are saving the world, but rather, are we making a world worth saving.