Inspirational Non-Fiction

Amazon Link:

The Road Goes Ever On – A Christian Journey Through The Lord of the Rings

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https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5UokQfy2NB3c3M5NS1ET0lKekk/view

Ann gives us a glimpse into the Christian ethos that was fundamental to Tolkien’s life and work. Do yourself and your children a favor. Buy, read and soak in this book.  John LaBriola, Author of Onward Catholic Soldier

Tolkien’s story, The Lord of the Rings, touches the soul in a profound way. Why is that? What makes the heroes so attractive? Can we ever become like them? The power to be strong and valiant is not limited to Middle-earth. We have been given the same tools and gifts that they are offered if we but recognize them. The rings of power in our society tempt us and our children as well. We would be wise if we awakened to that which tries our souls. Take a look at this classic from a Christian perspective, and you might bring Middle-earth a little bit closer to home.

 …a distinctive journey through tenets of the Christian faith as seen through the lens of The Lord of the Rings. It was a treat for someone like me who loves this story so much.  Brent King

country road after storm …the journey into The Lord of the Rings spirals ever deeper with each new lens. By providing several angles through which to gaze on Tolkien’s masterpiece, Frailey brings new color and life to Tolkien’s perennial classic. Brandon Vogt 

 

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I love how Ann compares the characters of The Lord of the Rings to various Saints. Phillip Uro rated it 5 of 5 stars on Goodreads

 

 

autumn11Excerpt from review by Fr. Daren Zehnle:

The primary tools employed in her mining are the three theological virtues (faith, hope and charity) the four cardinal virtues (prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance) and the seven gifts of the Spirit (wisdom, understanding, council, fortitude, knowledge, piety and fear of the Lord).  These virtues and gifts have, sadly, been much neglected in recent decades and her reflections serve as a clarion call to take them up again, to grow them and to use them each day of our lives.

Frailey sees each of these virtues reflected in the various characters of The Lord of the Rings and likewise finds their opposites, the seven capital sins (pride, covetousness, lust, anger, gluttony, envy and sloth) in these characters.  Her considerations of these virtues and vices present in the heroes and villains of Middle-earth can help us increase these same virtues and decrease these same vices within us because as she says, “In each character of The Lord of the Rings it is as if we can see the various struggles each person on this earth must grapple with in order to advance to that state of perfection which our Lord calls us to be as his sons and daughters.”